North Dakota HGH Growth Hormone Clinics

Written by Dr. Fredrick, Published on December 4th, 2016

North Dakota Map Of Blood Testing Facilities



HGH Blood Testing Center By Labcorp Represents a LabCorp Blood testing facility
HGH Blood Testing Center By Quest Diagnostics Represents a Quest Blood testing facility
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North Dakota

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) represents the exciting trend of health and wellness therapy in the 21st century, along with other treatments such as Stem Cell Therapy. Shortly, there will likely be treatments which not only facilitate improved quality of life but even much longer lifespans!

Our North Dakota Hormone Therapy Clinic is equipped to deliver the Hormone Replacement Therapy that is instrumental in helping patients live healthier and more active lives. We provide diagnostic and therapeutic HRT Services to patients of at least thirty years of age!

North Dakota ( /ˌnɔːrθ dəˈkoʊtə/ (  listen); locally [ˌno̞ɹθ dəˈko̞ɾə]) is a state in the midwestern and northern regions of the United States. It is the 19th most extensive, but the 4th least populous, and the 4th most sparsely populated of the 50 U.S. states. North Dakota was admitted as the 39th state to the Union on November 2, 1889. The state capital is Bismarck, and the largest city is Fargo.

North Dakota weathered the Great Recession of the early 21st century with a boom in natural resources, particularly a boom in oil extraction from the Bakken formation, which lies beneath the northwestern part of the state. The development drove strong job and population growth, and low unemployment.

North Dakota is known for its sparsely populated rural landscape, for its long winters that on colder days produce beautiful sun dogs, and for being the childhood home of Lawrence Welk.

History

Native American peoples lived in what is now North Dakota for thousands of years before the coming of Europeans. The known tribes included the Mandan people (maybe from around the 11th century), while the first Hidatsa group arrived a few hundred years later. They both assembled in villages on tributaries to Missouri River in what would become the west-central North Dakota. Crow Indians traveled the plains from the west to visit and trade with the related Hidatsas after the split between them - probably in the 17th century. Later came divisions of the Dakota people - the Lakota, the Santee, and the Yanktonai. The Assiniboine and the Plains Cree undertook southward journeys to the village Indians, either for trade or war. The Shoshone Indians in present-day Wyoming and Montana may have carried out attacks on Indian enemies as far east as Missouri. A group of Cheyennes lived in a village of earth lodges at the lower Sheyenne River (Biesterfeldt Site) for decades in the 18th century. Due to attacks by Crees, Assiniboines, and Chippewas armed with fire weapons, they left the area around 1780 and crossed the Missouri River sometime after. A band of the few Sotaio Indians lived east of Missouri River and met the uprooted Cheyennes before the end of the century. They soon followed the Cheyennes across Missouri and lived among them south of Cannonball River. Eventually, the Cheyenne and the Sutaio became one tribe and turned into mounted buffalo hunters with ranges mainly outside North Dakota. Before the middle of the 19th century, the Arikara entered the future state from the south and joined the Mandan and Hidatsa. With time, some Indians entered into treaties with the United States. Many of the agreements defined the territory of a specific tribe (see the map).

The first European to reach the area was the French-Canadian trader Pierre Gaultier, Sieur de La Vérendrye, who led an exploration and trading party to the Mandan villages in 1738, guided by Assiniboine Indians.

From 1762 to 1802 the region formed part of Spanish Louisiana.

European Americans settled in Dakota Territory only sparsely until the late 19th century, when railroads opened up the region. With the advantage of grants of land, they vigorously marketed their properties, extolling the area as ideal for agriculture. Congress passed an omnibus bill for statehood for North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and Washington, titled the Enabling Act of 1889, on February 22, 1889, during the administration of President Grover Cleveland. His successor, Benjamin Harrison, signed the proclamations formally admitting North Dakota, and South Dakota to the Union on November 2, 1889.

In recent years the state has had a strong economy, with unemployment lower than the national average and steady job and population growth. Much of the growth has been based on the development of the Bakken oil fields in the western part of the state. Estimates as to the remaining amount of oil vary, with some estimating over 100 years worth of oil remaining in the area.

Fine and performing arts

North Dakota's major fine art museums and venues include the Chester Fritz Auditorium, Empire Arts Center, the Fargo Theatre, North Dakota Museum of Art, and the Plains Art Museum. The Bismarck-Mandan Symphony Orchestra, Fargo-Moorhead Symphony Orchestra, Greater Grand Forks Symphony Orchestra, Minot Symphony Orchestra, and Great Plains Harmony Chorus are full-time professional and semi-professional musical ensembles that perform concerts and offer educational programs to the community.

Entertainment

North Dakotan musicians of many genres include blues guitarist Jonny Lang, country music singer Lynn Anderson, jazz and traditional pop singer and songwriter Peggy Lee, prominent bandleader Lawrence Welk, and pop singer Bobby Vee. The state is also home to Indie rock June Panic (of Fargo, signed to Secretly Canadian).

Agriculture

North Dakota's earliest industries were fur trading and agriculture. Although less than 10% of the population is employed in the agricultural sector, it remains a significant part of the state's economy. With industrial-scale farming, it ranks 9th in the nation in the value of crops and 18th in total cost of agricultural products sold. Large farms generate the most yields. The share of people in the state employed in agriculture is comparatively high: as of 2008[update], only approximately 2–3 percent of the population of the United States is directly engaged in agriculture. North Dakota has about 90% of its land area in farms with 27,500,000 acres (111,000 km2) of cropland, the third-largest amount in the nation. Between 2002 and 2007, total farmland increased by about one million acres (4,000 km2); North Dakota was the only state showing an increase. Over the same period, 1,800,000 acres (7,300 km2) were shifted into soybean and corn monoculture production, the most substantial such shift in the United States. Agriculturalists are concerned about too much monoculture, as it makes the economy at risk from insect or crop diseases affecting a significant crop. Also, this development has adversely affected habitats of wildlife and birds, and the balance of the ecosystem.

The state is the largest producer in the U.S. of many cereal grains, including barley (36% of U.S. crop), durum wheat (58%), hard red spring wheat (48%), oats (17%), and combined wheat of all types (15%). It is the second leading producer of buckwheat (20%). As of 2007[update], corn became the state's largest crop produced, although it is only 2% of total U.S. production. The Corn Belt extends to North Dakota but is situated more on the edge of the region instead of in its center. Corn yields are high in the southeast part of the state and smaller in other parts of the state. Most of the cereal grains are grown for livestock feed. An increasing number of livestock are fed corn.

The state is the leading producer of many oilseeds, including 92% of the U.S. canola crop, 94% of flax seed, 53% of sunflower seeds, 18% of safflower seeds, and 62% of mustard seed. Canola is suited to the cold winters, and it matures fast. Processing of canola for oil production produces canola meal as a by-product. The by-product is a high-protein animal feed.

Tourism

North Dakota is considered the least visited state, owing, in part, to not having a major tourist attraction. Nonetheless, tourism is North Dakota's third largest industry, contributing more than $3 billion into the state's economy annually. Outdoor attractions like the 144-mile Maah Daah Hey Trail and activities like fishing and hunting attract visitors. The state is known for the Lewis & Clark Trail and being the winter camp of the Corps of Discovery. Areas popular with visitors include Theodore Roosevelt National Park in the western part of the state. The park often exceeds 475,000 visitors each year.

Regular events in the state that attract tourists include Norsk Høstfest in Minot billed as North America's largest Scandinavian festival; the Medora Musical; and the North Dakota State Fair. The state also receives a significant number of visitors from the neighboring Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan, mainly when the exchange rate is favorable.

Major cities

See also: List of cities in North Dakota

Fargo is the largest city in North Dakota and is the economic hub for the region. Bismarck, in south-central North Dakota along the banks of the Missouri River, has been North Dakota's capital city since 1883, first as capital of the Dakota Territory, and then as state capital since 1889. Minot is a city in northern North Dakota and is home of the North Dakota State Fair and Norsk Høstfest. A few miles west of Bismarck on the west side of the Missouri River, the city of Mandan was named for the Mandan Indians who inhabited the area at the time of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. New Salem is the site of the world's most massive statue of a Holstein cow; the world's largest sculpture of a bison is in Jamestown.

Grand Forks and Devils Lake are in scenic areas of North Dakota. West Fargo, the fifth largest city in North Dakota, is one of the fastest growing cities and was recognized as a Playful City USA by the KaBOOM! Foundation in 2011. Williston is near the confluence of the Missouri River and the Yellowstone River near Montana. Medora in the North Dakota Badlands hosts the Medora Musical every summer and is the gateway to Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Fort Yates, along the Missouri River on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, claims to host the final resting place of Hunkpapa Lakota leader Sitting Bull (Mobridge, South Dakota also claims his gravesite).

State symbols

: List of North Dakota state symbols State bird: western meadowlark, Sturnella neglectaState fish: northern pike, Esox luciusState horse: Nokota horse state flower: wild prairie rose, Rosa arkansanaState tree: American elm, Ulmus americanaState fossil: teredo petrified woodState grass: western wheatgrass, Pascopyrum smithiiState nicknames: Roughrider State, Flickertail State, Peace Garden State, Sioux state. State mottos:(Great Seal of North Dakota) Liberty and Union, Now and Forever, One and Inseparable(Coat of arms of North Dakota) Strength from the Soil(Latin Motto of North Dakota, effective August 1, 2011) Serit ut alteri saeclo prosit (One sows for the benefit of another age.)State slogan: LegendaryState song: "North Dakota Hymn"State dance: square danceState fruit: chokecherryState march: "Flickertail March"State beverage: milk state art museum: North Dakota Museum of ArtState license plate: see the different types over time

"The Flickertail State" is one of North Dakota's nicknames and is derived from Richardson's ground squirrel (Spermophilus richardsonii), a widespread animal in the region. The ground squirrel continually distinctively flicks its tail. In 1953, legislation to make the ground squirrel the state emblem was voted down in the state legislature.

 

 


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